Dershowitz: Trump Has More Credibility Than Obama on North Korea

The liberal Harvard law professor noted how he hoped Trump isn’t doing what President Obama did with Syria when he failed to follow through after drawing a red line.

Dershowitz: Trump Has More Credibility Than Obama on North Korea

We Say: Parents understand that when they give important information to their child, they must use language the child understands. Hence, the public proclamations to the child-dictator of North Korea in the language of the video games that so absorb Kim-Jong-Un. President Trump made sure the child understood the enormity of the consequences of the threats he is sending.

The open hostilities of the Korean War wound down when an armistice was signed; the agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war.

While North Korea is stalled at the ox cart stage, South Korea has become a powerhouse economy on the world stage. Samsung, Hyundai (Kia), and LG produce and sell worldwide while literally ‘under the gun.’ North Korea experts Victor Cha and David Kang posted on the website of Foreign Policy magazine late last month that the North can fire 500,000 rounds of artillery on Seoul in the first hour of a conflict. (BusinessInsider.com)


Republished from Townhall.com, by Leah Barkoukis, August 14, 2017. Image credit: ‘combined fire demonstration’ held to celebrate the 85th anniversary of the North Korean army in Wonsan, North Korea / AP. Contributor: Donald Krebs.


Alan Dershowitz said President Trump has more credibility when it comes to North Korea than his predecessor did.

The liberal Harvard law professor noted how he hoped Trump isn’t doing what President Obama did with Syria when he failed to follow through after drawing a red line.

“I think that probably at this point President Trump has more credibility,” Dershowitz said on “Fox & Friends” Saturday.

Many lawmakers have expressed frustration over Trump’s rhetoric regarding North Korea, but the professor said it would be a mistake for Congress to interfere and try to pass legislation to block Trump from taking military action against Pyongyang if necessary.

“That actually blunts any presidential impact and I think it interferes with the president’s right as commander in chief to make decisions affecting the national security of the United States,” he said. “I think we ought to take a deep breath and wait and see how it plays out.”

Last week Trump said North Korea would be met with “fire and fury like the world has never seen” should they continue their provocations.

He then threatened that U.S. military solutions are ready to respond.

“Military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded, should North Korea act unwisely. Hopefully Kim Jong Un will find another path!” he tweeted Friday.

But some lawmakers have taken issue with the president’s tough talk.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said his “recent comments are recklessly belligerent and demonstrate a grave lack of appreciation for the severity of the North Korea nuclear situation.”

“Isolating the North Koreans has not halted their pursuit of nuclear weapons,” Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein said. “And President Trump is not helping the situation with his bombastic comments.”

Some Republicans have also joined Democrats in criticizing Trump’s rhetoric.

Sen. John McCain, for example, said he “take[s] exception to the president’s comments because you gotta be able to do what you say you’re gonna do.”


Republished from Townhall.com. CLICK HERE to read the original.


 

 

This content is published under the Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Please honor attribution.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.